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Best SVN Linux GUI?

I've been searching for a good SVN front end for Linux to replace the command line check in. I want the capability to choose a subset of modified files from which to commit, rather than having to check in the entire directory structure each time by doing a "svn commit .". This feature comes standard with Tortoise, but Tortoise is Windows-only.

I first tried out RapidSVN. This is a GTK front end that stores bookmarks on working directories. However, it did not have what I wanted.

I also tried eSVN. This is a front end built on qt. Initially, I tried "File -> Open Working Directory..." and this hung. I ran the esvn binary from the directory containing my svn checkout and I was finally able to select a working directory. The GUI also allowed a selectable subset of files!

I understand there is a subversion plugin for Eclipse. I will give this a try on my Ubuntu box.

All of these attempts were made on a RHEL 5.0 machine.

Comments

  1. You might try KDESvn although I'm sure it is dependent on some of the KDE libraries.

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