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Effective C++ - First 5 Items

In my copious free time, I am tackling "Effective C++, Third Edition" by Scott Meyers. The book is organized into 55 items which detail ways in which C++ code can be more effectively written. Through the first five items, there are two glaring deficiencies I've noticed with my own code: lack of use of const, and functions returning references to objects. This is one of those books that is starting to look like a fantastic collection of years of C++ and object-oriented experiences from many different engineers and reviewers, all mashed into one book. Could this book be a keeper?

Also on deck: "Effective Java, Second Edition" by Joshua Bloch.

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