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Building Wireshark on Win32

It was a tedious process, but here's how I got it done. I first tried to follow the:
http://www.wireshark.org/docs/wsdg_html_chunked/ChSetupWin32.html

However, it's not as straightforward as it seems. Here's the lowdown on how I got the source to build:

First, I tried building using the following environment:
- Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2003
- Cygwin 1.6 with unzip, bison, flex, perl, patch, wget
- Python 3.1
- Subversion 1.6.6-4
- TortoiseSVN 1.6.6

One of the source files, epan/dissectors/packet-dcerpc-netlogon.c, uses a variadic macro, which is only supported in MSVC 2005 and later. Wasn't interested in commenting out the code only to find more problems, so I abandoned this idea.

I then tried to come up with an environment that was probably more supported by Wireshark:
- Microsoft Visual Studio C++ 2008 Express Edition
- Cygwin 1.7 with unzip, bison, flex, perl, patch, wget
- Python 2.6.4
- Subversion 1.6.6-4
- TortoiseSVN 1.6.6

Things went well except a couple things:
- libssp0 needs to be installed in cygwin. Maybe it's because Cygwin 1.7 is so new and the Wireshark documentation has yet to be updated, but this is needed for the latest version of perl in cygwin.
- I cannot run the finished executable without the msvcr71.dll somewhere on the system, despite the fact that I built it against the VC 2008EE compiler. I am completely baffled.

Update: I found out that the current unstable version links to the MIT Kerberos build, which relies on MSVC .NET 2003 (msvcr71.dll), which appears to be the problem. I logged a bug on Wireshark's bugzilla, but I'll probably move forward with a stable branch to be productive.

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